Category Archives for Crash Courses

Meter

Read this article’s companion on Time Signatures. Meter is the structure of beats. Bars contain beats; but unlike a box of unbuilt Legos the beats are ordered in a hierarchical structure within the bar. Time signatures count the number of … Continue reading

27. April 2012 by Matthew Hall
Categories: Crash Courses | Tags: , | 2 comments

Time Signatures

Time signatures are not fractions. Thus 34is pronounced “three four time,” not “three fourths” or “three quarters time”; similarly 68is pronounced “six eight time,” not “six eighths time.” Time signatures answer the question: “How many of what?” Time signatures consist … Continue reading

27. April 2012 by Matthew Hall
Categories: Crash Courses | Tags: , | 1 comment

Sonata Form

Sonata form is a large-scale musical structure typical of 18th-century music and widely used throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries. It has its antecedents in the rounded binary forms of the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Sonata form … Continue reading

19. April 2012 by Matthew Hall
Categories: Crash Courses | Tags: , | Comments Off on Sonata Form

Picardy Third

A picardy third (also known as a tierce de picardie) refers to the use of a major chord at the end of a large section of music in a minor key. A good example of this device is its recurring use … Continue reading

19. April 2012 by Matthew Hall
Categories: Crash Courses | Tags: , | Comments Off on Picardy Third

Developing Variation

Development changes the musical material, and thereby explores new musical/emotional territory. For example, a melody may be presented and then extended, or complemented by a second melody. Variation takes a piece of musical material and explores its many implications by … Continue reading

13. April 2012 by Matthew Hall
Categories: Crash Courses | Tags: , | Comments Off on Developing Variation